Looney Tunes (1930)

Categorization

A series of 7-minute animated shorts for the Warner Bros.’s weekly distribution of a newsreel, a short and a feature film to affiliated theaters. Based on “Bosko the Talk-Ink Kid” (1929), it started as an imitation of contemporary Disney shorts, and eventually branched off into something more creative.

References here: Gestaltning i A Silent Voice, “Bosko the Talk-Ink Kid” (1929), Merrie Melodies (1931), “Lady, Play Your Mandolin!” (1931), “Crosby, Columbo, and Vallee” (1932), “Blitz Wolf” (1942), “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves” (1971).

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Entry:

“Sinkin’ in the Bathtub” (1930) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Categorization

The first Looney Tune billed as such.

Commentary

Very much an imitation of Disney’s musical Silly Symphonies (1929), by ex-Disney animators.

References here: “Bosko’s Holiday” (1931).

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Entry:

“Congo Jazz” (1930) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Pretty good flow. Almost catchy.

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Entry:

“Hold Anything” (1930) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Watch it for the “comical” beheading of a mouse, à la The Itchy & Scratchy Show (1989).

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Entry:

“Box Car Blues” (1930) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Starts off nicely with a Depression hobo motif and crazy train tracks, but the quality of the storyboarding, if there was any, goes down hill with the train.

References here: “Smile, Darn Ya, Smile!” (1931).

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Entry:

“The Booze Hangs High” (1930) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Non-human child characters drinking moonshine during Prohibition. Otherwise relatively plotless.

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Entry:

“Big Man from the North” (1931) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Subject

A Canadian Bosko using big guns and burying a sword to the hilt in his bigger opponent’s flesh.

Commentary

The shootout in pitch blackness is nicely rendered, but is a wasted opportunity for a visual game akin to “Symphonie Diagonale” (1924).

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Entry:

“Ain’t Nature Grand!” (1931) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Categorization

The first colour Looney Tune, with Bosko hesitantly and uniquely still shown in black (ambiguously made of ink or being of African descent) but reflected in water as reddish brown.

References here: “Ups ’n Downs” (1931).

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Entry:

“Ups ’n Downs” (1931) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Diverging from the preceding “Ain’t Nature Grand!” (1931), Bosko is entirely reddish brown in this one, after which the creative team went back to black and white for many years.

There are some relatively exciting ideas in this one. I particularly like the anthropomorphic hot dog that is almost eaten by a “real” dog, which is more of a commentary on the conventions of animated mediation than a mere pun. Though Baudrillard himself was just a year and a half old when this came out, it’s a gag worthy of the Baudrillardian Family Guy (1999).

References here: “Bosko’s Picture Show” (1933).

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Entry:

“Dumb Patrol” (1931) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Categorization

A relapse into black and white. Parody, I assume of Dawn Patrol (1930).

Commentary

The peak is firing a picket fence through an improvised machine gun.

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Entry:

“Yodeling Yokels” (1931) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

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Entry:

“Bosko’s Holiday” (1931) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

It revisits the situations of “Sinkin’ in the Bathtub” (1930) with less musical animism.

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Entry:

“The Tree’s Knees” (1931) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Interesting mainly because of its themed application of anthropomorphization to trees.

References here: “Bosko the Lumberjack” (1932).

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Entry:

“Bosko Shipwrecked!” (1931) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Pretty good as an example of the childlike character Bosko stabilized into. Interesting visual design in the lion chase, where the predator and prey together fill the screen. Stereotypical black cannibals.

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Entry:

“Bosko the Doughboy” (1931) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

WW1 trench warfare as a comedic cartoon just 13 years later, with a blackface “mammy” joke to cap it off.

References here: “Boom Boom” (1936).

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Entry:

“Bosko’s Soda Fountain” (1931) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Honey gets to do something that isn’t immediately about Bosko, but I wish the soda fountain had been more explored.

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Entry:

“Bosko’s Fox Hunt” (1931) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Fun for ecocriticism. The hunted fox resembles the more anthropomorphic character of Foxy in “Lady, Play Your Mandolin!” (1931). Observe the beautiful cascade of leaves as its slides down a pliable young tree to harmonious music. It usurps the role of carefree underdog from Bosko, the nominal, more human-aligned star.

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Entry:

“Bosko at the Zoo” (1932) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

The first third is OK, but there is little of interest after that, ecocritically or otherwise.

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Entry:

“Battling Bosko” (1932) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Strange use of radio, perhaps to save on animation time. The final image of Bosko going to sleep in the boxing ring, rolling its floor over himself like a blanket, blithe in defeat, nicely illustrates the evolution of the character. Unfortunately, even this shot is probably influenced by the pickaninny stereotype.

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Entry:

“Big-Hearted Bosko” (1932) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Too much repetition.

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Entry:

“Bosko’s Party” (1932) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

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Entry:

“Bosko and Bruno” (1932) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Subject

Hobo Bosko and his dog trek by the rails.

Commentary

Derivative, repeating several shots from earlier films in the series.

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Entry:

“Bosko and Honey” (1932) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

This one feels curiously modern in the very specific way that some of its shots are so cleanly representative that they invite use as animated GIFs on the Internet.

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Entry:

“Bosko’s Dog Race” (1932) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

More Itchy and Scratchy vibes.

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Entry:

“Bosko at the Beach” (1932) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Relatively solid as a whole. Partly decent water animation, good Wilbur, another salute to the trashy foodstuff that is hot dogs, juvenile sexuality, and the pedagogically incorrect choice of stepping on a giant tack on the beach, then simply leaving it in place for somebody else to step on. It’s vulgar and pretty dumb, but pleasantly so. The musical animism has stabilized as a fairly minor element.

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Entry:

“Bosko’s Store” (1932) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Incoherent, and rather tame apart from the closing “joke”: Wilbur pulling barbed wire across Bosko’s crotch.

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Entry:

“Bosko the Lumberjack” (1932) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Another “The Tree’s Knees” (1931), with a twist: Bosko chops down a small tree, whereupon it flops around on the ground anthropomorphically, apparently in paroxysms, until he knocks it on the “head” with the flat of his axe, killing it. Showing anything dying, even to this extent, is unusual despite the pervasive sadism of the series.

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Entry:

“Ride Him, Bosko!” (1932) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

The unusual establishing shot of the street is put to good use. I also like the wobbly wagon, the silent intertitles, and the animators appearing in live action to cheerfully give up and go home. Unlike the tech demo of “Bosko the Talk-Ink Kid” (1929), that last joke would not look out of place on Adult Swim in 2017. Even Bosko is especially good in this one.

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Entry:

“Bosko the Drawback” (1932) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Subject

Football.

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Entry:

“Bosko’s Woodland Daze” (1932) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

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Entry:

“Bosko in Dutch” (1933) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Subject

A series of visual stereotypes about the Netherlands.

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Entry:

“Bosko in Person” (1933) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Subject

Bosko and Honey perform on stage as if, in their previous films, they had been actors.

Commentary

It’s worth seeing simply because it’s becoming equivalent to the palliata comoedia that Latinists can parse word by word, but cannot actually understand because the idioms in them are extinct. Bosko in Person builds heavily on contemporary allusions. All of these can still be reconstructed and understood by experts, of course, but I would have got few of them without subtitles, and none of them are actually constructive: mere idioms repeated for the pleasure of cognitive ease and recall. For example, seeing an asbestos curtain burn in escalation of its appearance in “You Don’t Know What You’re Doin’!” (1931) would have no comedic value to a kid who’s never heard of the contemporary panic or the material’s flame-retardant properties. Bosko’s face contorting into that of Jimmy Durante, uttering catchphrases, is even less charged with meaning, and more lost. Even knowing, it’s not actually funny, just morbidly fascinating as dead culture.

References here: “Bosko’s Picture Show” (1933), “The CooCoo Nut Grove” (1936), Blazing Transfer Student (1991).

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Entry:

“Bosko the Speed King” (1933) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

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Entry:

“Bosko the Sheep-Herder” (1933) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

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Entry:

“Beau Bosko” (1933) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Subject

Bosko in the Foreign Legion.

Commentary

The soldiers singing good morning to their officer is a little funny.

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Entry:

“Bosko’s Mechanical Man” (1933) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Categorization

The last of Bosko for quite a while.

Subject

Bosko builds a robot to get out of doing chores. Inspired by a newspaper headline, he assumes the robot will be an effective general-purpose slave. It is at first violently erratic, assuming a walking animation loop that resembles a freestyle swimming stroke because of the cogs drivings its arms. Honey sprays it with perfume, giving it a more docile, effeminate personality. For a moment, it even seems prepared to do work, bringing out a roll of toilet paper(!) while Bosko plays the piano, but as soon as he stops playing it segues into a frown and stretches out its arms à la Frankenstein (1931). There’s a charming cut of it grinding its teeth, which are also cogs, moving laterally across its face. Again, it is Honey who calms it down, this time using a record of “Mary Had a Little Lamb” which she inserts into the robot. Alas, the record skips and the robot maliciously electrocutes the dog. Bosko then destroys the robot with dynamite thrown into its waiting mouth, leaving the thing blown open with a mechanical cuckoo working like a tongue and a calendar ticking across its chest.

Commentary

Surprisingly rich in accessible symbols of modernity, and they’ve aged pretty well too. Even the dog getting tired and slowing down, illustrated simply by its animation loop getting dragged out unrealistically across more frames, is pretty funny. A strong last outing.

References here: “The Blow Out” (1936).

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Entry:

“Bosko the Musketeer” (1933) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

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Entry:

“Bosko’s Picture Show” (1933) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Subject

Bosko runs a movie theater, leads an audience-participation performance of “We’re in the Money” about the Great Depression, and shows some clips. Adolf Hitler chases Jimmy Durante down a quaint Germanic street on an Out-Of-Tone newsreel, followed by a Haurel and Lardy comedy.

Commentary

Livelier than the very similar “Bosko in Person” (1933), and it’s aged a lot better. Dirty Dalton’s walking bicycle in the Marx brothers caricature is still funny, though his generic catchphrase (“Aha, my proud beauty”) has almost fallen out of living culture. The final shot, of Bosko the presenter leaping onto and through the movie screen, leaving a hole in Dalton and thereby saving Honey, the movie-in-the-movie’s damsel in distress, prefigures postmodern entertainments in the same way as “Ups ’n Downs” (1931).

References here: “Buddy’s Theatre” (1935), I rök och dans (1954).

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Entry:

“Buddy’s Day Out” (1933) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Hugh Harman and Rudolf Ising had left Warner Bros. over a budget dispute with Schlesinger, taking Bosko and their other characters with them. Bosko’s successor is more clearly a human boy, which is to say that Buddy exists in a slightly more realistic framework. I wonder how important Bosko’s origins in blackface were to the reduction of plastic surrealism here; perhaps it was actually harder for the white animators to imagine an apparently white kid in fanciful circumstances. More likely, the added verisimilar predictability of this reboot, and the character names appearing in superimposed captions prefiguring sitcom intros, were both choices made to invite a less capable new audience.

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Entry:

“Buddy’s Beer Garden” (1933) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

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Entry:

“Buddy’s Show Boat” (1933) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

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Entry:

“Buddy the Gob” (1934) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Compounding the error in “One Step Ahead of My Shadow” (1933), the background artist fails to distinguish between the stated setting (China) and Japan, using torii. Buddy is particularly boring here.

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Entry:

“Buddy and Towser” (1934) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

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Entry:

“Buddy’s Adventures” (1934) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

The balloon sequence has some nice animation, but Sourtown is entirely unfunny.

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Entry:

“Buddy’s Garage” (1934) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

I like the process of oiling the anthropomorphic car after the shower. Buddy squirts its axles at the arm pits and groin, and the engine(?) at a belly button, tickling the machine.

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Entry:

“Buddy’s Trolley Troubles” (1934) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Derivative of train-themed Bosko shorts.

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Entry:

“Buddy of the Apes” (1934) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Subject

Buddy as Tarzan attracts a tribe of jungle cannibals.

Commentary

“Junior”, the little ape, has more personality than Buddy. Observe the range of modern customs and variations within the hostile tribe, co-existing with the obvious racism.

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“Buddy’s Bearcats” (1934) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

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Entry:

“Buddy the Detective” (1934) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

I like the moody musician, and particularly the early shot of a tree jazzing it up on his piano, to his consternation.

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Entry:

“Buddy the Woodsman” (1934) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Subject

A parade of naïve shortcuts for the lumber trade, whereas “red hot pepper” fails to drive off a bear.

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“Buddy’s Circus” (1934) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

References here: “Shake Your Powder Puff” (1934).

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Entry:

“Viva Buddy” (1934) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

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Entry:

“Buddy the Dentist” (1934) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Extraordinarily boring, like a particularly ill-advised subplot from a moribund sitcom episode. Very little of it would have been impossible in live action.

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Entry:

“Buddy’s Theatre” (1935) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

An imitation of “Bosko’s Picture Show” (1933) modified for Buddy’s image as an imaginary playmate. I don’t get the Swiss navy joke on the newsreel; it doesn’t seem to have anything to do with Switzerland being landlocked.

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Entry:

“Buddy’s Pony Express” (1935) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

In the spirit of Bosko.

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Entry:

“Buddy of the Legion” (1935) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Chuck Jones’s first credit as animator on a Warner Bros. cartoon. Notice how, in the framing device at the book shop, white Buddy has acquired Bosko’s subversiveness and pickaninny nonchalance. The Foreign Legion dream sequence conflates numerous notions about Africa, Arabia, Amazons and overbearing women.

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Entry:

“Buddy’s Lost World” (1935) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

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Entry:

“Buddy’s Bug Hunt” (1935) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Subject

Hear ye! Hear ye! Buddy will be tried in court for cruelty to insects.

Commentary

Minor ecocritical interest. Buddy learns a lesson here, which is unusual in a Looney Tune.

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“Buddy in Africa” (1935) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Yeah, it’s pretty racist. I wonder what the kangaroo is doing there.

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Entry:

“Buddy Steps Out” (1935) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Note the closeups. The team was trying to refine their technique, but they didn’t have appropriate character designs for it.

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Entry:

“Buddy the Gee Man” (1935) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Categorization

The last of Buddy, in a joke prepended to ‘G’ Men (1935).

Subject

Buddy investigates a cruel prison warden, replaces him and makes the prison a paradise.

Commentary

Potentially interesting for the childish optimism. Good riddance, Buddy.

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Entry:

“A Cartoonist’s Nightmare” (1935) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

A metafictional homage to the minor villains that Warner Bros. cartoonists felt they had to make up and treat poorly in earlier Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies to inject melodramatic tension, sometimes just in the last couple of minutes. I like the design of the animation studio: A ramshackle dungeon with a lot of character.

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Entry:

“Hollywood Capers” (1935) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Subject

Beans versus a metallic Frankenstein’s monster.

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Entry:

“Gold Diggers of ’49” (1935) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Categorization

First short directed by Tex Avery.

Commentary

I love the mountain-as-a-casino metaphor, and Little Kitty is a marginally more interesting female character than her predecessors.

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Entry:

“The Phantom Ship” (1936) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

A step backward. Beans seems to lose his original character, becoming instead an “uncle” in a plot of plastic animism that could just as easily have happened in a Bosko short six years earlier.

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Entry:

“Boom Boom” (1936) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Subject

Trench warfare. Beans and Porky Pig find a portable foxhole.

Commentary

“Bosko the Doughboy” (1931) also uses the slide whistle for WW1 artillery bombardment. This one kicks it up a notch. It’s practically archetypal as a clean and joyful depiction of truly extreme violence, including an anthropomorphic horse chased by homing shells, eventually taking a hit and becoming an angel. I don’t think it’s bowdlerization, but it doesn’t seem to be an attempt to laugh at the horror either.

References here: Life Is Beautiful (1997).

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Entry:

“Alpine Antics” (1936) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

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Entry:

“The Fire Alarm” (1936) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

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Entry:

“The Blow Out” (1936) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Notwithstanding the greyscale film and the villain’s resemblance to Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens (1922) and to caricatures of Jews in contemporary German propaganda, this is a huge step forward in characterization and creativity, with the energy level and zaniness of “Bosko’s Mechanical Man” (1933). Tex Avery finds his groove and it is good.

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Entry:

“Westward Whoa” (1936) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Subject

An ambiguous lesson in not crying “Wolf!” or, in this case, not crying “Indians!”

Commentary

Sadistic and racist with not much else going on. Beans the cat’s second-to-last appearance and his last as a nominal lead.

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Entry:

“Plane Dippy” (1936) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Subject

A US Air Force “robot plane” under declarative voice control.

Commentary

Entirely a comedy, but the depiction of the self-steering vehicle is somewhat prescient. It gets the squash-and-stretch treatment but is not anthropomorphized or given a will of its own. Its dangerous behaviour is entirely the fault of the poor control mechanism, which requires no authentication at the unarmed lab stage seen here. In fact, as a robot it is extremely competent.

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Entry:

“Fish Tales” (1936) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Subject

Porky goes fishing, opposed by anthropomorphized worms and fish.

Commentary

Another kinetic couple of steps toward the iconic stuff to come, and one of the strongest implicit reflections on funny animal ecology thus far. Unlike “Goin’ to Heaven on a Mule” (1934), Porky’s nightmare about being fished into the sea with a fake donut—by the fishy father of a nuclear family of four—is neither induced by alcohol nor does the protagonist seem to regret giving up the habit of fishing as a result.

References here: “Porky’s Duck Hunt” (1937).

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Entry:

“Shanghaied Shipmates” (1936) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

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Entry:

“Porky’s Pet” (1936) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

Notice the sleeping and static characters who are painted as part of the background. They don’t even get single cels. Warner Bros. trying to save money I suppose.

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Entry:

“Porky the Rain-Maker” (1936) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Subject

In a drought-stricken county, a farmer’s son spends their last dollar on an apparent huckster’s weather control pills, and they work.

Commentary

Another hit from the early Tex Avery. The farm animals, which include no pigs since the farmers are pigs, go picketing for feed like strikers. When the horse eats a fog pill we get a close-up of a horse fly—a miniature flying horse—reporting low visibility on its radio.

The bondfångare is selling his miracle “at cost”, “today only” and says to Porky, in imitation of a W.C. Fields catchphrase, “Don’t lean on the platform kid, you bother me.” In any normal film this would be a simple confidence man, a criminal, the villain of the piece, but Avery is already playing with reasonable and genre expectations. The man (pig) is telling the truth and is in fact able to solve the problem of the Dust Bowl. When the rain does come, the crops immediately become hyperfertile, perhaps to the delight of children watching the movie in Oklahoma. It is a pretty good example of an extreme and open, but entirely playful, concession to the wishful thinking of children. I wonder if it predisposed anyone to get taken in.

References here: “Get Rich Quick Porky” (1937).

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Entry:

“Porky’s Poultry Plant” (1936) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

A fine debut by Frank Tashlin, infusing the usual anthropomorphic agricultural chaos with unusual empathy.

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Entry:

“Porky’s Moving Day” (1936) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

Commentary

It rises to a brief but lovely absurdity.

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Entry:

“Boulevardier from the Bronx” (1936) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2018.

Commentary

A case of atypical anthropomorphism, allowing some cockish behaviour by the cocks.

References here: “Casey at the Bat” (1946).

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Entry:

“Little Beau Porky” (1936) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2018.

Subject

Porky in the French Foreign Legion.

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Entry:

“Porky in the North Woods” (1936) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2018.

Subject

“Porky’s Game Refuge”.

Commentary

Lots of ecocritical interest here: The protection of nature by ownership and rules, and the revenge of nature led by an especially anthropomorphic pig.

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Entry:

“Milk and Money” (1936) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2017.

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Entry:

“Porky the Wrestler” (1937) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2018.

Commentary

It could just as easily have been Bosko.

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Entry:

“Porky’s Road Race” (1937) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2018.

Commentary

Mostly reference humour. Despite this being Mel Blanc’s series debut, it isn’t done with the same warm feeling and visual flair as “The CooCoo Nut Grove” (1936).

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Entry:

“Picador Porky” (1937) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2018.

Subject

Bullfighting.

Commentary

I like the “safety zone” gag.

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Entry:

“Porky’s Romance” (1937) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2018.

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Entry:

“Porky’s Duck Hunt” (1937) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2018.

Subject

The debut of Daffy Duck as an unnamed, barely anthropomorphic trickster.

Commentary

Another step forward from the similar “Fish Tales” (1936). Excellent energy, the best of the series up to this point.

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Entry:

“Porky and Gabby” (1937) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2018.

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Entry:

“Porky’s Building” (1937) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2018.

Commentary

Porky’s established personality plays no part here. He’s been reduced by mass production.

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Entry:

“Porky’s Super Service” (1937) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2018.

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Entry:

“Uncle Tom’s Bungalow” (1937) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2018.

Commentary

Quoth Tom, “My body may belong to you, but my soul belongs to Warner Brothers.” That’s the over-stressed animators identifying with the stereotyped slave.

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Entry:

“Porky’s Badtime Story” (1937) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2018.

Commentary

Oddly oppressive. The mean boss does not get his comeuppance.

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Entry:

“Porky’s Railroad” (1937) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2018.

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Entry:

“Get Rich Quick Porky” (1937) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2018.

Commentary

Less daring than “Porky the Rain-Maker” (1936).

animation fiction moving picture

Entry:

“Porky’s Garden” (1937) IMDb

Extent

Seen in 2018.

animation fiction moving picture